The American Research Center in Eygpt

LECTURE: Popular and Profane Experiences with the Sublime: The Temple as a Social and Cultural Focus in Egypt

LECTURE: Popular and Profane Experiences with the Sublime: The Temple as a Social and Cultural Focus in Egypt

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LECTURE: Popular and Profane Experiences with the Sublime: The Temple as a Social and Cultural Focus in Egypt

Chapter: New York, NY

Presenter: Dr. Lanny Bell, Department of Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies, Brown University

Location: Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, 15 East 84th Street (between 5th and Madison)

This lecture is free and open to the public.

RSVP required: Please promptly reply to isaw@nyu.edu

Description: Because of the focus that the temple provided in their lives, the people of Egypt have always been active on its peripheries. In antiquity they even participated in public processions during annual festivals, when they were introduced into the less restricted courtyards and ceremonial halls of the temple.  In the role of “congregation,” they took part as both adorers and witnesses to the dramatic success of the important rites conducted there.  In political terms, these festivals constituted symbolic display, staged to reinforce the king’s power and position as head of society.  This lecture examines human aspects of the New Kingdom temple (1570-1070 BCE). and the connection between ancient Egypt as an important component of modern Egypt. 

About the Speaker: Lanny Bell is an acknowledged leader in the documentation of the monuments of ancient Egypt and the interpretation of ancient Egyptian culture. He received his BA in Egyptology from the University of Chicago in 1963; in 1976 he received his PhD in Egyptology from the University of Pennsylvania. He has been teaching since 1965. Professor Bell specializes in ancient Egyptian divine kingship, the temples of Thebes, and Egyptian epigraphy. No armchair scholar, he has been active in Egypt since 1967, conducting fieldwork in Luxor for the University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania and for the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. He has been lecturing for the Archaeological Institute of America (or: AIA) since 1971, and has accompanied numerous tours to Egypt since 1973.

 

 

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