The American Research Center in Eygpt

Lecture: The Ancient Egyptian House and its Furnishings: A Walk through the Egyptian Galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Beyond

Lecture: The Ancient Egyptian House and its Furnishings: A Walk through the Egyptian Galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Beyond

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Lecture: The Ancient Egyptian House and its Furnishings: A Walk through the Egyptian Galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Beyond

Date: Wednesday, November 19, 2014; 6:00pm

Chapter: New York

Presenter: Dr. Phyllis Saretta, Visiting Scholar, Department of Egyptian Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N.Y., (to be introduced by Dr. Catharine Roehrig, Curator in the Department of Egyptian Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art).

Location: Manatt, Phelps & Phillips, LLP, 7 Times Square, N.Y., N.Y. 10036 (23rd Floor Reception), Entrance to 7 Times Square is on Broadway at 42nd Street, next to The Loft. Photo ID is required to enter the building. You will then proceed to the 5th floor Sky Lobby and take the 2nd elevator bank to the 23rd floor reception

FREE TO THE PUBLIC. Reception to follow lecture.

R.S.V.P. REQUIRED: Please reply to info@arceny.com

Description: The ancient Egyptians were superb craftsmen and excelled in the art of woodworking and making furniture. Their outstanding ability and the high technical level they reached shows a conscious effort to achieve an aesthetic effect as well as a practical purpose. Home decoration varied according to an individual’s station. While the wealthy would have sumptuously decorated furniture, inlaid with ivory and ebony, or colored stones and faience, the lower classes sat on simple chairs and stools

This presentation will examine a variety of objects from different levels of society which could be found in an ancient Egyptian home, such as tables, chairs, beds, stools, storage chests, lamps, headrests, baskets and other household furnishings. Examples come from excavated pieces discovered in tombs, representations of furniture carved on tomb and temple walls, and model and miniature furniture.

About the Speaker: Phyllis Saretta received her Ph.D. from New York University in Egyptology, and Ancient Near East Archaeology and Languages in 1997. She was awarded an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in the Department of Egyptian Art at The Metropolitan Museum in 1994-95, where she completed the research for her dissertation entitled, Egyptian Perceptions of West Semites in Art and Literature during the Middle Kingdom: An Archaeological, Art Historical and Textual Survey, which focused on the cultural, social and historical interconnections between Egypt, Mesopotamia and the Levant.

Dr. Saretta has conducted independent research in Egypt at the site of Beni Hasan, and has participated in archaeological fieldwork at the ancient Mesopotamian site of Lagash (Tell al-Hiba) in Southern Iraq where she was a Site Supervisor. She has taught undergraduate courses at The New School University on both Egypt and Mesopotamia, and was a part-time Staff Lecturer and Researcher at the Metropolitan Museum of Art for 19 years. She is currently writing a book entitled, Asiatics in Middle Kingdom Egypt: Perceptions and Reality, which will be published by Bloomsbury, Egyptology Series.

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